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What bears do in February

February at a Glance: Pregnant female black bears give birth. Cubs begin to grow. Bears snug in their dens live off fat reserves, recycle waste and by-products into useful amino acids and heal many injuries. Other bears don’t hibernate at all; they just reduce their activities and make day beds so they can take periodic naps. Dens turn into nurseries Pregnant female black bears give birth to an average of ...

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garden harvest

Are your gardens and landscaping BearWise?

A bear would need to forage all day to find as much food as it can harvest in an hour or two in a kitchen garden. No wonder bears are attracted to the nicely organized plots of nutritious, ready-to-eat produce ...
black bear in the springtime, coming out of hibernation

Bear alarm clocks are going off now

Bears’ internal alarm clocks start ringing in March, with many adult male bears emerging from their dens during the month of March. Next to wake up will be juveniles of both sexes, then female bears with yearlings and solitary females ...
bears getting into trash and birdseed

Action plan for a BearWise year

Remember all that stuff you meant to take care of before spring? Bear alarm clocks will be going off soon, so now’s the time to put those plans into action. Here is a quick reminder list of things that could ...
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The Bear Facts

What bears do in July

July at a Glance: By July, cubs born this year have grown to the size of a raccoon or a small dog with big ears. Yearling bears now on their own can be the size of medium dogs. Bears of ...
male black bear (by Tom Harrison

What bears do in June

June at a Glance: Yearlings leave mom and search for food, shelter and a place of their own. Adult males travel far and wide looking for mates. Nursing moms venture farther from home base searching for food. Cubs keep growing and ...
Black bear cub in a tree

What bears do in May

May at a Glance: All bears visit all the places where they reliably found food last year. Cubs learn how to climb up (and down) trees and learn to “talk.” Cubs are still nursing, but start experimenting with bear food ...